Deep Breathing

Breathing feeds oxygen to every cell in the body. Without sufficient oxygen, people are more prone to health problems

Everyday breathing isn’t enough to keep the oxygen flowing through the body at peak levels. “Lungs at rest and during most daily activities are only at 50 percent of their capacity.

you need to challenge the lungs with more intense activity. 

“And to help counteract the build-up of toxins and tar in the lungs caused by environmental pollutants, allergens, dust and cigarette smoke, you need to help your lungs cleanse themselves,

Breathing correctly is important for your overall well being. its benefits are uncountable

  1. Find a comfortable, quiet place to sit or lie down. 
    1. Start by observing your breath. First take a normal breath. 
      1. Now try taking a slow, deep breath. The air coming in through your nose should move downward into your lower belly. Let your abdomen expand fully.
      2. Now breathe out through your mouth/nose
    2. Alternate normal and deep breaths several times. 
      1. Pay attention to how you feel when you inhale and exhale normally and when you breathe deeply. 
        1. Shallow breathing often feels tense and constricted, 
        2. while deep breathing produces relaxation.
  2. Now practice diaphragmatic breathing for several minutes. 
    1. Put one hand on your abdomen, just below your belly button. 
      1. Feel your hand rise about an inch each time you inhale 
        1. your chest will rise slightly, too, in concert with your abdomen
        2. Remember to relax your belly so that each inhalation expands it fully.
      2. and fall about an inch each time you exhale. 
  3. Breath focus in practice. Once you’ve taken the steps above, you can move on to regular practice of breath focus. (When you first start, 10 minutes of breath focus is a reasonable goal. Gradually add time until your sessions are about 15 to 20 minutes long.)
    1. As you sit comfortably with your eyes closed, blend your breathing with helpful imagery and a focus word or phrase that will help you relax. 
      1. Imagine that the air you breathe in washes peace and calm into your body. 
        1. As you inhale, try saying this phrase to yourself: “Breathing in peace and calm.
      2. As you breathe out, imagine that the air leaving your body carries tension and anxiety away with it. ” 
        1. As you exhale, say: “Breathing out tension and anxiety.” 

1. Diaphragmatic breathing

2. Simple deep breathing

As you slowly inhale, consciously expand your belly with awareness of lowering the diaphragm. Next expand your ribs, allowing the floating ribs to open like wings. Finally, allow the upper chest to expand and lift.

After this, exhale as completely as possible by letting the chest fall, then contracting the ribs and, finally, bring the stomach muscles in and up to lift the diaphragm and expel the last bit of air.

Deep Breathing

Most people take short, shallow breaths into their chest. It can make you feel anxious and zap your energy. With this technique, you’ll learn how to take bigger breaths, all the way into your belly.

  1. Get comfortable. You can lie on your back in bed or on the floor with a pillow under your head and knees. Or you can sit in a chair with your shoulders, head, and neck supported against the back of the chair.
  2. Breathe in through your nose. Let your belly fill with air.
  3. Breathe out through your nose.
  4. Place one hand on your belly. Place the other hand on your chest.
  5. As you breathe in, feel your belly rise. As you breathe out, feel your belly lower. The hand on your belly should move more than the one that’s on your chest.
  6. Take three more full, deep breaths. Breathe fully into your belly as it rises and falls with your breath.

Breath Focus

While you do deep breathing, use a picture in your mind and a word or phrase to help you feel more relaxed.

  1. Close your eyes if they’re open.
  2. Take a few big, deep breaths.
  3. Breathe in. As you do that, imagine that the air is filled with a sense of peace and calm. Try to feel it throughout your body.
  4. Breathe out. While you’re doing it, imagine that the air leaves with your stress and tension.
  5. Now use a word or phrase with your breath. As you breathe in, say in your mind, “I breathe in peace and calm.”
  6. As you breathe out, say in your mind, “I breathe out stress and tension.”
  7. Continue for 10 to 20 minutes.

Modified Lion’s Breath

As you do this exercise, imagine that you’re a lion. Let all of your breath out with a big, open mouth.

  1. Sit comfortably on the floor or in a chair.
  2. Breathe in through your nose. Fill your belly all the way up with air.
  3. When you can’t breathe in any more, open your mouth as wide as you can. Breathe out with a “HA” sound.
  4. Repeat several times.

Belly breathing

Belly breathing is easy to do and very relaxing. Try this basic exercise anytime you need to relax or relieve stress.

  1. Sit or lie flat in a comfortable position.
  2. Put one hand on your belly just below your ribs and the other hand on your chest.
  3. Take a deep breath in through your nose, and let your belly push your hand out. Your chest should not move.
  4. Breathe out through pursed lips as if you were whistling. Feel the hand on your belly go in, and use it to push all the air out.
  5. Do this breathing 3 to 10 times. Take your time with each breath.
  6. Notice how you feel at the end of the exercise.

Roll breathing

Roll breathing helps you to develop full use of your lungs and to focus on the rhythm of your breathing. You can do it in any position. But while you are learning, it is best to lie on your back with your knees bent.

  1. Put your left hand on your belly and your right hand on your chest. Notice how your hands move as you breathe in and out.
  2. Practice filling your lower lungs by breathing so that your “belly” (left) hand goes up when you inhale and your “chest” (right) hand remains still. Always breathe in through your nose and breathe out through your mouth. Do this 8 to 10 times.
  3. When you have filled and emptied your lower lungs 8 to 10 times, add the second step to your breathing: inhale first into your lower lungs as before, and then continue inhaling into your upper chest. Breathe slowly and regularly. As you do so, your right hand will rise and your left hand will fall a little as your belly falls.
  4. As you exhale slowly through your mouth, make a quiet, whooshing sound as first your left hand and then your right hand fall. As you exhale, feel the tension leaving your body as you become more and more relaxed.
  5. Practice breathing in and out in this way for 3 to 5 minutes. Notice that the movement of your belly and chest rises and falls like the motion of rolling waves.
  6. Notice how you feel at the end of the exercise.

Practice roll breathing daily for several weeks until you can do it almost anywhere. You can use it as an instant relaxation tool anytime you need one.

Morning breathing

Try this exercise when you first get up in the morning to relieve muscle stiffness and clear clogged breathing passages. Then use it throughout the day to relieve back tension.

  1. From a standing position, bend forward from the waist with your knees slightly bent, letting your arms dangle close to the floor.
  2. As you inhale slowly and deeply, return to a standing position by rolling up slowing, lifting your head last.
  3. Hold your breath for just a few seconds in this standing position.
  4. Exhale slowly as you return to the original position, bending forward from the waist.
  5. Notice how you feel at the end of the exercise.

3. “Counting” your breaths

You can also increase your lung capacity by increasing the length of your inhalations and exhalations. Start by counting how long a natural breath takes. If it takes to the count of five to inhale it should take to the count of five to exhale. You’ll want them to be of equal length.

Once you’ve discovered the count for your average breath, add one more count to each inhale and exhale until you can comfortably extend the length of time it takes to fill and empty your lungs.

7. Staying active

“Regular moderately intense activity is great for the lungs, and when you increase your daily activity you get three things done at once: healthy lungs, a healthier heart and a better mood,” Ryan says. 

Aim for at least least 20 minutes of consistent, moderately intense movement daily, like a brisk walk or bike ride.

Progressive Muscle Relaxation

In this technique, you breathe in as you tense a muscle group and breathe out as you release it. Progressive muscle relaxation helps you relax physically and mentally.

  1. Lie comfortably on the floor.
  2. Take a few deep breaths to relax.
  3. Breathe in. Tense the muscles of your feet.
  4. Breathe out. Release the tension in your feet.
  5. Breathe in. Tense your calf muscles.
  6. Breathe out. Release the tension in your calves.
  7. Work your way up your body. Tense each muscle group. This includes your legs, belly, chest, fingers, arms, shoulders, neck, and face.